Culture Changers with Allison Hare

EP63: BLM Series: Now What? Aissa Hillebrand and Racial Healing

Episode Summary

[fusebox_track_player url="https://episodes.castos.com/5e3aa627bb42e8-95594950/EP63-Aissa-Hillebrand-BLM-Series.mp3" artist="Culture Changers Podcast" title="EP63: BLM Series: Now What? Aissa Hillebrand and Racial Healing" social_twitter="true" social_facebook="true" social_linkedin="true" social_pinterest="true" social_email="true" ] Host Allison Hare talks to Aissa Hillebrand, Entrepreneur, and Transformational Business Coach. Aissa Hillebrand talks about how she has been affected by the murder of George Floyd and Black Lives Matter as a woman born to an African American father from Trinidad and a Puerto Rican mother. Aissa Hillebrand also discusses the lack of real talking in society about race, what it means to belong and have community, and what it takes to arrive at genuine authenticity.  Episode Highlights: Allison Hare introduces Aissa Hillebrand. How did Aissa Hillebrand feel during George Floyd’s murder and the response to it?Did she feel supported during the ‘Blackout Tuesday’ social media screens?What was it like in terms of race growing up black and Puerto Rico?Is it an unconscious bias when white people criticize riots? What is the next step for us all to create change?How can the conversation about race reach those from homogenous communities that aren’t diverse at all? Aissa Hillebrand shares how she explains race to her son who has vitiligo on his arm.  Does she feel like she has to go out of her way to prove her value in society to others?  Eventually, you will have to be yourself, not just fit in.  Let’s get back to actually talking.   There is an opportunity to heal.    Race is coming up on a global scale and the time is up. Change is happening.  Social work is spiritual work, not political.  Get centered with who you are as a person. Sign up for Aissa Hillebrand’s Healing Talks About Hope and Race: aissahillebrand.com 3 Key Points Accept yourself for who you are instead of seeking external validation from others.   We have to have real face-to-face conversations about racial inequality.   Unfortunately, we are often treated based on how people perceive us based on their personal bias towards how we look.  Tweetable Quotes: “Everybody really has to do their own work in this whole process. But, we need to be able to know that advocacy and social justice is a spiritual practice and we need to work on that. The time has come.” –Aissa Hillebrand“I became an advocate. I think for the young child within me. You know? Saying it is ok. You are good enough. Really, the acceptance needs to come from within you. What is it that you’re doing to accept yourself?” –Aissa Hillebrand(Racial Inequality) “For me, the most important thing is to continue having the conversation.” –Aissa Hillebrand Resources Mentioned: Text me at 470.242.6311. Subscribe to this podcast, SHARE, and find me everywhere at Allison’s Linktree.Aissa Hillebrand social media: Linkedin TwitterAissa Hillebrand website: aissahillebrand.com

Episode Notes

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Host Allison Hare talks to Aissa Hillebrand, Entrepreneur, and Transformational Business Coach. Aissa Hillebrand talks about how she has been affected by the murder of George Floyd and Black Lives Matter as a woman born to an African American father from Trinidad and a Puerto Rican mother. Aissa Hillebrand also discusses the lack of real talking in society about race, what it means to belong and have community, and what it takes to arrive at genuine authenticity.

Episode Highlights:

3 Key Points

  1. Accept yourself for who you are instead of seeking external validation from others.
  2. We have to have real face-to-face conversations about racial inequality.
  3. Unfortunately, we are often treated based on how people perceive us based on their personal bias towards how we look.

Tweetable Quotes:

Resources Mentioned: